Category: Card Games

HOW TO CUSTOMIZE A CLASSIC CARD GAME

HOW TO CUSTOMIZE A CLASSIC CARD GAME
For centuries, playing cards have been a standard component used in games.  The period and country in which playing cards first originated are not solid, but its popularity in entertainment is certainly recognizable.  Just as our ancestors, we host game nights with our friends and family.  The difference today is the card games they created are now referred to as eminent classics. We typically play these classic card games with a standard 54-card deck.  But have you ever considered putting a personal twist on one of these games?  At Shuffled Ink, every component of your deck is customizable, allowing for a suitable design process!  To get you started, here are some suggestions on how to customize a classic card game.

Your Original Illustrations

Each card game has an underlying theme.  Most of the time, the game’s title gives it away.  For example, if you wanted to personalize the classic children’s game Go Fish, then you can create card backs and faces with various sea creature illustrations.  This complements the traditional card game by introducing an interactive and lively feel to each playing card. If you are not confident in your artistry, no need to worry.  Our expert graphic design team will assist you every single step of the way to ensure that your innovative illustrations will embody your vision.

Unique Rule Revisions

Card games should have a clear basis for rules and directions.  But you do not have to follow the card game’s original set of rules.  Enhance your gaming experience by personalizing an instructions sheet with your unique rule revisions.  Even the most common and popular games can be improved.
  • Add a Twist: If you are customizing the classic card game Uno, let your ideas run wild.  As a fun twist, perhaps instill a rule that allows a one-time instance where a player who is holding 12 or more cards can choose to give at least one of their cards to any player they choose.  This can possibly cause a level of frustration equal to when someone is dealt with a “Draw Four” card.

Classic Game Accessories

A traditional 54-card deck is typically the sole component needed when playing a classic card game like War, Gin Rummy, Canasta, etc.  If you’re looking to add a creative element, consider including custom accessories like dice, spinners, timers, etc.  This implementation will naturally change some elements to the game, but that makes it more intriguing and, of course, personal.
  • Higher Stakes: If you are familiar with the card game War, then you know that it is merely based on luck.  If you need a refresher on this classic game, two players challenge each other to see who puts down the highest card.  The goal is to obtain the most playing cards.  The original game consists of one determinant that guarantees which card will win the round.  Use dice to make the stakes higher.  Not only will you need to have the highest card between the two but will also roll the dice and add that onto the number on the card for the grand total.  This way, your luck will be tested not once but twice!
  • Quick Paced: There is nothing more frustrating than playing a slow card game.  We have all either experienced playing alongside one of these types of players or have been the player who tends to slow the game down.  A game timer can easily fix this distracting dilemma and luckily can be used in practically any classic card game.  You just need to assign someone to handle tracking the time.

Classic Card Games Tailored to Your Taste

The possibilities are truly endless when customizing with Shuffled Ink.  Whether you decide to add a personal twist to a classic card game or start from scratch, we will assist with all your innovative ideas.  Pair your creativity with the basis of the card games we have been playing for centuries to create a game that’s better than ever!   ● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Games at: ShuffledInk

PLAYING CARDS THAT PORTRAY HISTORY

PLAYING CARDS THAT PORTRAY HISTORY
For thousands of years, we have linked playing cards to card tricks, games, gambling and art, but there are also card decks that reflect history. All cultures and societies have their respective innovations, conflicts and hierarchical structures.  And during experiences of greatness and despair, some artists depicted historic moments in time and legendary figures onto playing cards.

South Sea Bubble Playing Cards

In 1720, Thomas Carington Bowles created the satirical South Sea Bubble playing cards.  Unlike the smooth card stock that we use today, these cards were printed on copper plates.  The cards below depict the South Sea stock market’s fleeting boom and ultimate destructive collapse, which led France into an economic crisis.  Click on the image to see close-ups of each card.
The Jack of Hearts in this card collection indicates one of many unfortunate financial situations; this one is based on a distraught South Sea woman who has now lost a large quantity of her riches. The caption reads: A South Sea Lady having much improv’d, Her Fortune proudly slighted him the Lov’d, But South Sea falling, sunk her Fortune low, She would have had him then, but he cry’d no.

Playing Card Casino

The first legal casino house surfaced in 1638 Venice: The Ridotto. This enabled others to follow suit. During the 17th century, Louis XIV’s finance minister, Cardinal Mazarin, sought to provide revenue for the royal family, so he transformed the Palace of Versailles into a card-playing casino. The cards below feature French soldiers holding detailed playing card flags toward the sky, most likely to praise and glorify this newfound entertainment source.
Both government-controlled and underground casinos created a vast production of card materials. Soon after the introduction of gaming houses, Great Britain began charging a tax on card manufacturing. This led to the infamous Stamp Act of 1765. The tax implementation created strict rules on any forged printed materials like stamps and cards, resulting in felony charges, and in many cases, death. Stamp Act Excerpts, Playing Card Provisions: And for and upon every pack of playing cards, and all dice, which shall be sold or used within the said colonies and plantations, the several stamp duties following (that is to say) For every pack of such cards, the sum of one shilling. And for every pair of such dice, the sum of ten shillings.

WWII Map Decks

During World War II, prisoners of war used playing card decks to escape from German prison camps.  The United States Playing Card Company created card decks that helped at least 32 individuals escape and prompted more than 300 attempts.  Once applied with water, the POW would peel back each card to find escape routes.  The Escape Map cards will forever illustrate hope and perseverance during a time where danger and uncertainty were prevalent.

The Ace of Spades: Death Cards

Card suits and symbols were printed on more than just decks.  During the mid-20th century, the 101st Airborne Division painted the Ace of Spades emblem on their combat helmets for good luck.  But in Vietnamese culture, this card symbolizes death, humiliation and suffering. Two U.S. lieutenants decided to take advantage of this superstition by shipping only Ace of Spades decks to Southeast Asia where they scattered them across villages and the jungle.  This caused many Viet Cong fighters to flee at the sight of the Death Cards.  Even today, the Ace of Spades depicts psychological warfare used during the Vietnam War.

Legendary Figures on the Court Cards

KINGS

Recognizing court cards (King, Queen and Jack) as prominent figures developed long after the establishment of the modern deck. So, in a way, while this “fact” has been debunked, the association is still true. For a period of time, and depending on the country, particular famous figures were assigned to a court card. For example, French and British decks identified their court cards with these four monarchs: Charles VII of France, the Biblical figure David, Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar. You may have noticed slight variations on face cards: Positioning of swords and hands, medieval attire and crown designs.  This is no coincidence. The Suicide King: The King of Hearts features an oddly positioned sword that is piercing the side of his head.  Never noticed?  Pull out your own deck of cards and look.  This is the only King who appears to be stabbing himself in the head with a sword. While the King of Hearts has varied in design throughout the years, there is always one consistency: The act of suicide or harm.

QUEENS

Queen playing cards have many face versions but the most common four figures are Pallas, Judith, Rachel and Argine. The Breakdown:
  • Queen of Spades: Pallas or Athena; the goddess of strategic war, courage and inspiration in Greek mythology.
  • Queen of Hearts: Judith; a Biblical figure and heroine
  • Queen of Diamonds: Rachel; the wife of Biblical figure Jacob
  • Queen of Clubs: Argine; anagram of Latin name Regina, which means Queen

JACKS

The Jack face card was previously called a Knave, which means male servant.  Eventually, they realized that it did not make sense to have two Ks (with the King and Knave) or even a Kn since the first initial is present on the face cards.  But even the new term Jack had its flaws.  It was originally used in a demeaning manner, aimed toward lower-class people.
  • Jack of Spades: Hector, a Trojan Prince
  • Jack of Hearts: La Hire; member of Charles VII’s court and comrade to Joan of Arc)
  • Jack of Diamonds: Ogier, one of Charlemagne’s Knights
  • Jack of Clubs: Judah Maccabee, or Lancelot

COVID-19 Pandemic Depicted on Playing Cards

One day, people will be curious about the historic moments we once experienced – both the good and bad.  For example, the Coronavirus pandemic has created an entirely new world for us, where we social distance, wear masks and work from home.  Undoubtedly there will be recollections and statistics written in history books but playing cards will also be used to tell stories about the past.  We created a collection of COVID-19 Playing Cards with the intention of providing helpful virus tips, suggestions, statistics and more.  Like the South Sea Bubble cards, these decks will be great for future generations to discover and interpret historical events.
● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Games at: ShuffledInk

CARD GAMES CREATED DURING PANDEMICS

CARD GAMES CREATED DURING PANDEMICS
Pandemic outbreaks are constant threads in human history.  These worldwide infectious diseases date back to as early as 165 CE when the Antonine Plague struck the Roman Empire.  A curious observation that has recently circulated the internet is the roughly 100-year disease pattern: 1720 Plague; 1817 Cholera; 1918 Spanish Influenza; 2019 Coronavirus. It’s difficult to call these repetitions a simple coincidence, but we won’t go into deep conspiracy theories today.  Instead, here’s a list of the various card games, playing card designs and board games created during such unprecedented times.

1720: Bubble Playing Cards

The Great Plague of Marseille hit Western Europe in 1720, taking the lives of nearly 100,000 people in France.  While England feared the disease would spread to their own country due to the constant use of Marseille’s ports, they were also dealing with the repercussions of the South Sea Bubble.  The South Sea stock market collapsed less than a year after it started to boom. The playing cards featured below satirize the devastating financial crash, detailing both counterfeit and authentic investment trades that ultimately led to the demise of many fortunes.  Created and designed by Thomas Carington Bowles, the cards placed both a comical tone on a devastating financial time and helped to subside worries about the disease’s spread.

1817: Durak Card Game

Reports of Cholera can date back to 5th century B.C., but it wasn’t until 1817 that the first Cholera pandemic occurred.  Over the course of six years, this disease hit India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, China, Japan and parts of European territories like Russia. The card game Durak became popular in Russia during the 19th century.  Its exact origin is unclear, but it can be assumed that this game allowed for a decent distraction while Cholera spread throughout Russia.  There are numerous sources that label it as the most popular and well-known card game in Russia.  Durak’s objective is to avoid being the last player holding cards and requires a 36-card deck. Durak consists of two types of players: attackers and defenders.  A player who leads with the lowest trump card is the first attacker.  The player who sits to the left of the attacker is referred to as the first defender.  Once a player places a playing card into the middle, an attack is put into place.  Defenders will counter this attack by placing a higher-ranking card of the same suit into the middle.  Now, if the attacker placed a non-trump suited card into the middle, then a defender simply must play any trump card to beat the card played. If the defender succeeds, then the attacker can try again by playing a card that shares the rank of the previous card played.  Once the first attack/defend ends, the player to the left of the attacker makes their move.
https://youtu.be/3JagmUmUJOc

1918: Uncle Wiggily Board Game

Spanish Influenza caused a global pandemic that killed nearly 50 million people.  Some of the authoritative measures taken during this 20th-century pandemic mirror our own methods against the Coronavirus.  This included quarantining those who were ill, closing schools and enforcing the value of handwashing and wearing masks. Playing card games and board games with one’s family increased in popularity during the 20th century.  Two years prior to the outbreak, Milton Bradley Co., an American board game manufacturer, transformed the famous novel, “Uncle Wiggily’s Adventures” by Howard Garis, into a board game.  The game’s popularity matched that of the novels’, allowing for the series to come to life in a visually appealing manner.  While the game has undergone many changes since its publication, it has reigned in popularity for over a century while also having survived the deadliest pandemic in history.

2019: Our Clients’ Card Designs

For the past seven weeks or so, we have been living in an unfamiliar world.  Reality hit home when the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) named COVID-19 a pandemic. We encourage both our clients and prospective clients to continue working on their customized game designs.  This is the perfect opportunity to take your mind off of the current situation. Consider creating a playing card project that brings enjoyment and entertainment.  Here are some incredible products that we have printed for our clients during COVID-19:
We at Shuffled Ink hope that you are staying safe during this pandemic.  Our manufacturing facility is fully operational and ready to assist you!  Stay safe, and we will get through this together! ● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Games at: ShuffledInk

CARD GAME IDEAS FOR FATHER’S DAY

CARD GAME IDEAS FOR FATHER'S DAY
With Father’s Day around the corner, ordinary gifts will not do. Give dad a custom game that is specific to his interests and hobbies. After all, it makes sense to create something just as one-of-a-kind as your dad. Not to mention, these personally designed card games are perfect for family game nights! Now, here is our list of ideas to help you ace this year’s gift!

1. Go (Family)!

Drawing from the classic game Go Fish, create a custom card game that replaces suits and numbers with pictures of family members and friends. Regardless of how many people are in your family, you will have a blast trying to collect four of a kind of your brother and sister (and do not forget to include all the housepets as well)! When customizing your own card game, it opens doors for all sorts of decision-making including designing an exclusive set of rules. Feel free to stray as far away from the original Go Fish format or follow it to a tee!

2. Trading Card Game

Unlock old memories for dad by printing a new set of Trading Card Games. Combine the idea of athlete trading cards and Pokemon battles to design the all-time Fantasy Sports League. To make it simple, narrow down the game to just one sport. It would not be fair to play football players against baseball players since they are not in the same league. For this example, let’s go with baseball. Each player receives 9 cards.

The Breakdown: 3 Card Types

  • The Athlete: These cards include players who hold any position. Even though you are dealt 9 cards to account for each player on the field, it is not guaranteed that your hand will include a player for every single position. But there is also a possibility of receiving a Utility player, which means they can play any position on the field. That is where the trading comes into play. But remember, it is important to check their card for details like strength, agility, power and speed.
  • Boosted Energy: When an athlete card is played during the battle, or the stand-off, it is important to utilize the Boosted Energy card. Match the action symbol to the Boosted Energy to enhance the designated characteristic.
  • Training Gear: The equipment style and brand that you decide to use also plays an important factor during a stand-off game. Whichever bat, glove or cleats you decide to use must fit well with the athlete and their strengths/weaknesses.
We understand there are a lot of factors that go into creating a Trading Card Game. We have simply provided a brief foundation for what it can look like. While the rest is up to you, our graphics team will assist you with the creative process, so get started! For further assistance with creating a battle card game, follow this Trading Rule Book.

3. To Drink or Not to Drink

Last Father’s Day, we put together a list of custom playing cards to give dad. One suggestion was printing a deck with his favorite alcoholic beverage. As a side note, we added that a customized drinking game could also be a good choice in the gift-giving department. To expand on that idea here is a ‘Drinking Edition’ card game to consider creating!

A Spotlight on Dad

Even though it is Father’s Day, that does not give dad a complete pass. Yes, this is a game to put dad on the spot, but the whole family (if at least 21+) can get involved.
  • How to Play: Come up with questions for each card that varies from ‘ridiculously easy’ to ‘momentary thinkers’ and, finally, to ‘most challenging’. Think of it as a trivia game, where dad must answer a series of questions about your family and friends. Now, here is where the ‘to drink or not to drink’ aspect comes into play. If dad answers the question wrong, then he drinks, but if he answers the question correctly, then everyone else drinks. Of course, you can implement as many game accessories as you see fit like dice, timers and spinners.

4. A Custom Deck for Any Card Game

Every dad should have their own personal deck of cards. Whether he is playing a single-player or multi-player game, there is something special about using cards made just for you. When it comes to designing a deck, the possibilities are truly endless. Every detail of your playing card deck is completely customizable including the artwork, written content, card stock, packaging, etc. Here are a few recommendations to kick off the creative process!
  • Family Custom Backs: One of our clients created an adorable Father’s Day deck with a photograph of their child. Naturally, this is the perfect deck to break out for both a solo and family/friends game night.
  • Animal Custom Faces: Your pet is an equal member of the family, so why not include them in a gift to dad. After all, the phrase “Man’s Best Friend” could not be any more true. So, if your dad is absolutely in love with the family dog (or whichever animal you have), then visit our Design Shop to print their wagging tails and smiling faces on a deck of cards.

5. Buy A Deck

If you would rather purchase a deck of cards rather than build your own, we have some options for you on our Shopify site.
  • Quarantine 2020 Playing Card Deck: This Quarantine deck is particularly relevant at the moment and would make for a perfect gift! It is also a great way to remember what was going on in the world during Father’s Day 2020. Besides, who would not be intrigued by dealing a deck of cards with custom masked face cards!

#StayAtHome and #AloneTogether: CARD GAMES TO PLAY AT HOME!

#StayAtHome and #AloneTogether: CARD GAMES TO PLAY AT HOME!

In light of the current pandemic, we want to remind our clients that we are in this together.  We urge you to listen to the CDC Guidelines to ensure safety for yourself as well as others who may be more receptive to this virus. Our message mirrors that of the CDC:  Stay home and please take social distancing seriously.

Shuffled Ink has created a new deck of Coronavirus Playing Cards with 52 Helpful Tips to play and learn how to be safer. The cards focus on how to deal with the virus including proper handwashing techniques, common symptoms to be mindful of, CDC facts, reputable sources to rely on for updates, etc.

COVID-19 has created a new normal for our society, where we are advised to social distance and self-quarantine.  This means that we are spending more time at home than usual.  For many, your work, home and social life are now under one roof.  Consider this an opportunity to connect with your family members through games!  For these recommendations, all you need is a standard 52-card deck.

SPADES

Round up your family members and choose your partner wisely for this trick-taking card game.  The rules are relatively simple, where the goal is to have the highest-ranking card among all players during each trick.  The highest rank is Ace, while the lowest is a two.  With that said, please note that any spades card will outrank ALL clubs, hearts and diamonds cards, even an Ace.

HOW TO PLAY:

1. Assign a dealer to give each player 13 cards.  Keep your cards hidden from all other players.

2. Assign a designated scorekeeper to record the bids made by each player.

3. Every player will analyze their cards and bid how many tricks he/she believes they will make during each trick played. (Note: if you bet 0 tricks will be won, or nil and you are correct then you will receive 100 points BUT for each additional trick won, you will receive -100 points).

4. The player to the left of the dealer will play his/her card first.  The following players must put the same suit down if possible.  Whoever wins that trick will start off the next one by putting down the first card.

5.  If you do not have the same suit as the person who put down the first card, then you are free to choose any card and suit you’d like.

6.  Once the entire round is complete, the players will count how many tricks they won.

7. If a team matches the bid with the actual amount of tricks won, they will receive 10 points.  If a team exceeds the bid with the actual amount, they will receive one point for each additional trick that they won.

8. The bag score is calculated by counting up the total score for each team (Player 1, 2; Player 2,3).  Add the bid from player 1 and 2, then add the actual score from player 1 and 2.  This creates the bag score, so if a team reaches 10 bags, then they will receive -100 points.

9. The first team to 500 wins.

GO FISH!

You most likely learned this game when you were younger, so here’s a refresher on how to play this family-friendly card game.  The goal is to obtain four cards of the same face to create a book.  This game is played with at least two players (in this case 7 cards will be dealt).

HOW TO PLAY:

1. Assign a dealer to give each player 5 cards (if played with 3 or more players).  Do not show any players your cards.

2. Typically, the player who is to the left of the dealer will start off, but you can start with any player you’d like.

3. Players will ask any opponent if they have a certain card.  You can only ask for that card IF you hold in your hand at least one card of the rank that you’re asking for.

4. If you are asked “Do you have any Queens?” then you MUST give that player ALL of your Queens.  Then, the player will continue to ask various players if they have any Queens.  If the player asked doesn’t have any Queens, then you say “Go Fish”.

4.  If you are asked to “Go Fish” then you pick up a card from the stacked collection at the center of the table, and it is the next player’s turn.

5.  Once a player obtains four of a kind, they will make it known to their opponents by placing the four cards face up next to them.

6. At the end of the game, each player will count up how many books they have.  Whoever has the most books wins the game.

CHEAT

Full of bluffing and deceit, this game will keep your family members on their toes. The objective is to be left with no cards and to also ensure that when/if you lie about a card you play that you won’t get caught in the act.

HOW TO PLAY:

1.  Assign a dealer to evenly distribute playing cards to each player until the deck runs out.

2. The order in which the cards are placed face down is from the highest-ranked card to the lowest-ranked card.  This means the player who starts must put down any/all of their Aces in the center pile.

3.  Now, it’s the next player’s turn to go.  If you don’t have the same value as the person before, you can put down one card above or one below the previous player’s card.  (Note: You have to put down AT LEAST one card).

4.  If you believe that someone is lying either about how many cards they are putting down or if they are even putting down the appropriate card, then you call out CHEAT.

5.  If you are CORRECT that the player is being deceitful, then that player must pick up all of the cards in the center pile.

6.  If you are INCORRECT that the player is lying, then you have to pick up all of the cards in the center pile.

7.  The first player to be left empty-handed wins the game.

ROLLING STONE

This card game’s rules are simple and the game itself is engaging for children in particular.  The idea is similar to that of Cheat, but there is no bluffing involved.  The goal is to run out of cards!

HOW TO PLAY:

1. The dealer must shuffle and give 8 cards to each player.

2. The player to the left of the dealer starts off the game by placing any card of any suit at the center of the table.

3. Going clockwise, the next player(s) must put down a card that follows the same suit as the first card played. Once all players have followed suit and contributed to the pile, that’s the end of the trick.

4. All of the cards played during the previous trick will be discarded.  To determine who won the trick, find which player put down the highest-ranking card.  The winner of the trick will lead the next one and place any card in the new pile.

5. If during a trick, a player does not have the selected suit in their hand, then they must collect all of the cards in the center pile, adding it to their current hand.  This player will end up starting the next trick.

6. The player who has no cards left in their hand will win.

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU

For nearly two decades, we have assisted in making your customized projects come to life! And we will continue to do so, as our manufacturing facility and office are fully operational. While this is a unique time, it is also a great opportunity to start working on a customized game that you may have put on the back burner. So, stay at home and get started — we can’t wait to see your creative ideas! ● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Tarot Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Game at: ShuffledInk

THE BEST BOARD GAMES DECADE-BY-DECADE

THE BEST BOARD GAMES DECADE-BY-DECADE
Decade-by-decade it’s natural for trends to change. Whether it be a new fashion statement or a new board game, we are constantly seeking the “new thing”. Now, change is inevitable. It’s actually a good thing to accept this ever-changing world. Without it, we would still be throwing sticks rather than using dice. As the decade quickly comes to a close, we’ve comprised a list of some of the best board games of each decade. Take a look at how board games have evolved over the years. And you’ll also find a sneak peek into what 2020 may have to offer for the future of board games.

The 1950s: Candy Land

While Candy Land was actually introduced to the world in 1949, it reigned as one of the leading popular games throughout the ’50s. Today, it continues to be popular among children and certainly nostalgic for adults. According to Tim Walsh, an American game inventor and writer, 60 percent of households that have a 5-year-old child, own the game Candy Land. Clearly, its popularity did not cease after the ’50s came to a close. And we are certain that the upcoming ’20s will be no different.

The 1960s: The Game of Life

The Big Game Hunter permanent collection

The Checkered Game of Life 1866 Edition
This game is quite unique because it reached great heights in popularity during its original production in 1860, as well as during its revamp in 1960. This game is the perfect example of how a board game changes with the trends and times. During the 19th century, The Checkered Game of Life was Milton Bradley’s first printed and sold board game. Introduced during Abraham Lincoln’s presidency while slavery was not yet abolished (1865), this first installment was a melancholier board game than what we are accustom to. One of the checkered sections was actually labeled “suicide”. It detailed a man hanging by a noose from a tree branch (see below). If a player fell on this space, they were booted from the game. The altered 1960s board game naturally varies from today’s version. Those who played during the 20th century would either end the game as an impoverished farmer or they would reside in Millionaire Acres. Today, the concept of rural vs. urban plays a role but is less dramatic and stereotypical. You’ll either end up in Countryside Acres or Millionaire Acres. Nevertheless, both game versions represent a similar goal: reaching happiness in the game of life.

The 1970s: Mystery Date

While the board game Mystery Date was released during 1965, its popularity spiked during the ’70s upon updating. If the tagline doesn’t give too much away, ‘Meet Your Secret Admirer,’ the game was targeted toward young girls. The goal was to land your dream date with one of the boys who waited behind the door while avoiding “the dud” who wore normal clothing. The more admirable suitors were dressed in either formal, beach, skiing or bowling attire. Throughout the years, this game has notably changed its aesthetic to keep up with the varying decades.

The 1980s: Pictionary

In 1987, Pictionary sold 3 million copies. It was then deemed 2nd place on the highest selling games ranking. The top spot was held by the Nintendo Entertainment System. Similar to the idea of charades, players draw hints for their teammates with the end goal of guessing the correct word being sketched. It is the game’s simplicity and the ability to evoke competition that created its popularity during family game nights. Personally, I find Pictionary to be more comfortable to play than charades. Rather than using your body to act out something, you put pen to paper and allow the motionless drawing to do all the action.

The 1990s: 13 Dead End Drive

You may remember this board game from its sensationalized and quirky advertising TV commercials. This murder-themed board game was released in 1993. The objective of the game is to inherit the fortune that was left by the wealthy character Aunt Agatha. The goal is to take down each of your opponents by trapping them in an area that will knock them down and boot them out of the game. Instead of playing on a flat surface with game pieces, this game’s structure implemented a 3-D board to issue a more realistic gaming experience.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofz_wA-aTI0

The 2000s: Apples to Apples

This board game was released to the public halfway through 1999, as the new decade was approaching. Throughout the 2000s, and even much of the ’10s, this game was a phenomenon. It brought families with children of all ages together for game night and it wasn’t short of entertainment. I remember playing the game with my parents, siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins, as we gathered around the living room hoping that our card would be the chosen one. Nearly 15 years later, my family continues to crack jokes about that family game night. Funny Story: If you’re wondering why my family still talks about the time we played Apples to Apples during Fall 2009, here’s the story. It was my sister’s turn to be the judge, so she read her adjective card aloud: Annoying. We all quickly and competitively slid our one card to my sister in the hopes that we would get chosen and find ourselves one step closer to winning. My sister read through each card and decided to pick Patrick Swayze. The adults gasped, wondering why she had chosen the beloved actor who had actually died only a few months prior. My sister responded with, “I just didn’t know who he was, which was annoying. So he gets the ‘Annoying’ card!” My aunts and uncles responded with, “too soon, too soon.” Turns out, my brother had won that round and was ironically using it as a throw-away card. To this day, anytime Patrick Swayze is mentioned we all say, “too soon, too soon.”

The 2010s: Codenames

The original word guessing game was released in 2015. Since then, it has broadened its board game horizons and created different editions, with the same overall goal but varying concepts manifested. During Codenames word game, if you are the spymaster in your team of two, your goal is to describe the word(s) to your partner without specifically using any of the words in your set.  This game calls for strategy, teamwork and, of course, secrecy. If you have a competitive nature, try this one and play it as a final hoorah to the ’10s decade. (But I’m positive it’ll continue its popularity reign into the ’20s).

The Future: 2020s

At Shuffled Ink, we can manufacture any board game that wish to design. Throughout the years we’ve assisted in the creation of your customized board games, complete with customized accessories, booklets, dice, instructions, spinners, timers, tuck or setup boxes and more. You all, our clients, are the future of what board games have to offer in 2020. What will board games look like in the future? We have an idea that may or may not be wildly far-fetched. Nevertheless, that question is for your innovative minds to decide and for us to help make possible. ● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Tarot Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Games at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Flash Cards at: ShuffledInk

40+ GREAT CARD GAMES FOR ALL OCCASIONS

40+ GREAT CARD GAMES FOR ALL OCCASIONS
So you have a beautiful deck of custom playing cards. Now what? You can certainly put it quietly and safely on your display shelf, occasionally looking at it out of the corner of your eye to remind you that it is really yours, give an admiring glance at the exquisite tuck case, and get a fuzzy feeling inside knowing that it contains some wonderful cards within. You can even take out the cards from time to time, to feel their embossed and papery touch in your hand, and remind them that they are loved. And maybe you can even take them for an occasional spin with some high flying cardistry magic, or use them for some card magic. But one of the best ways to enjoy a wonderful custom deck is by using it for a card game. That way you actually get to use the deck, and others get to enjoy it too. And during moments of down time, when you are staring at a hand of cards, you can savour the stunning artwork and just enjoy the creativity. But what card games should you play? Most people have learned a handful of card games at best, but the truth is that there is just a whole world of wonderful card games out there, just waiting to be discovered and explored. I have a large collection of other modern games, but over the years I have learned a lot of card games with a traditional deck, and I find myself often coming back to them – especially when I have a custom deck in my hands! So here is a list of some of my favourite traditional games with standard playing cards, arranged alphabetically, and grouped roughly according to their primary suitability for adults or children. Included at the end of the list is a section with books about games with playing cards that I own and can recommend, along with links to some other resources. Each game also notes its suitability according to the number of players. It is worth noting that several games are excellent for just two players. Although some more recently invented games are included, for the most part the emphasis of this list is on traditional card games that have stood the test of time in some way, and we are not concerned here with using a standard deck to play modern games. Obviously there are many other games that can be played with a standard deck of cards besides the ones included here. This list is not intended to be exhaustive, but just represents the ones are most well-known, and for the most part are games that I have personally tried and enjoyed, or ones that I know are good classics that are worthwhile learning. I hope this will encourage you to stretch yourself outside of your comfort zone, and that you will take the time to learn and explore some new territory. Believe me, it is really worth it, because there are some truly fantastic games here! Each game has a direct link to where you can find the rules on Pagat.com, which is the most authoritative and comprehensive website with rules for card games.

Social and Family Games

This category is somewhat arbitrary in that some of the card games in the other categories can also be enjoyed socially or with children, and the games in this category are certainly not just for children. But if I was looking for a fun and lighter game that is easy to learn and play, these are all excellent choices. Blitz (2-12 players) – A popular and casual/social card game, also known as “Scat”, “Thirty-One”, “Ride the Bus”, and “Blitz”. By drawing and discarding a card each turn, the aim is to try to improve your three card hand to have the closest to 31 points in one suit. Cheat (3-13 players) – Also called “I Doubt It” or “Bullsh**”, this is a game many children have played. The aim is to be the first to get rid of all your cards, and you can bluff about what cards you are playing on a turn, but if you get challenged and caught out you have to pick up the entire pile. Egyptian Ratscrew (2-6 players) – This is a quick-slapping game that is like Slap Jack on steroids, and has been published commercially under the name Slamwich. Fan Tan (3-6 players) – Also known as “Sevens”, “Domino”, “Parliament”, and “Pay or Play”. In turns players play a card to a common layout, which will begin with sevens as the foundation for each suit. Once a seven is played, you can build up or down on that suit, with the aim to be the first to play all your cards. GOPS (2 players) – A simple and quick bidding/bluffing game for two players. The Diamonds are point cards corresponding to their value, and revealed one at a time in random order. Players each get an entire suit as their hand (Clubs or Spades), and play a card of their choice, with the revealed point card going to the higher played card. GOPS is an acronym for “Game Of Pure Strategy”, since there is zero luck. Knock Out Whist (2-7 players) – Also called “Trumps”, this is a simplified version of Whist, where the aim is to avoid elimination after each hand by winning at least one trick. The first hand has seven tricks, and it becomes harder to stay in the game because each successive hand has one less trick. A perfect game to introduce people to trick-taking. Mao (2-7 players) – This game has especially been popular in college and university crowds since the 1960s, and the aim is not just to win but to have fun. Essentially it is a Crazy Eights variant with special additions, but the rules may not be discussed; new players are expected to try to figure out the rules by observing a game and by trial and error. Theoretically there are overtones of Mornington Crescent, Fizzbin, and Calvinball, but Mao is actually a playable game. Palace (2-6 players) – Also called “Sh**head” or “Karma”. A very light casual game, where the aim is to avoid being last to get rid of your cards. Players each have a row of three face down cards, a row of three face up cards covering these, and a hand of three cards. On your turn you play cards equal or higher than the card on the discard pile, otherwise you pick up the entire pile. President (3-16 players) – Classically known as “Chairman,” “Scum,” or “A**hole”, and fun for groups, this is an easy introduction to the family of climbing games. The aim is to get rid of cards as soon as possible, and you must play at least as many cards as the previous player, but with higher values. Depending on the order in which players go out, a new hierarchy of players is established. A variation of this was published commercially as The Great Dalmuti. For more advanced climbing games, see Big Two later on this list. Ranter-Go-Round (3-12 players) – This is also known as “Chase The Ace” or “Cuckoo”, with slight variations. A simple game of passing cards around, with a high luck element, the player with the lowest card at the end loses a chip, and the aim is to avoid being eliminated by losing your chips. Rummy (2-6 players) – A classic card game, in which players draw and discard cards, trying to get “melds” that typically consist of sets of the same values or runs of consecutive values. Many variants exist, including Gin Rummy, which is an excellent game and appears later on this list, as well as some commercially published games like the Mystery Rummy series. Contract Rummy(3-5 players) also developed from Rummy, and adds the complication that in each round players have to fulfil a different contract, which is a fixed combination of sets or runs, that they must have before they can meld. A version of Contract Rummy was published commercially under the name Phase Ten. Scopa (2-6 players) – A fascinating classic Italian card game that is especially good for two players, and for four players as a partnership game called Scopone. Players are using cards in their hand to “capture” point-scoring cards from a common pool, with captured cards matching or adding up to the value of the card played from hand. Also recommended is Escoba (3-4 players), which is the Spanish name for the Scopa di Quindici variant common in Brazil, in which you capture cards that add to a total of 15 by including a card from your hand. Closely related to Scopa is Cassino, which has gives some added options for play, and appears later on this list. Speed (2-4 players) – Also called “Spit”, this a high speed game similar in style to Nertz (see later on this list), but slightly easier and more suitable for children. The aim is to be the first to get rid of all your cards by simultaneously and quickly playing cards of higher or lower value to a common stock. Spoons (2-8 players) – A hilarious game for kids or large groups, also known as “Pig” or “Donkey”. Players have four cards and simultaneously pass a card to the left, trying to get a set of four matching cards, at which point they take a spoon from the center, which is the signal for everyone to grab a spoon – but there is one less spoon available than the number of players! “My Ship Sails” is a variation that has the aim to collect seven cards of the same suit.

Trick-Taking Games

Trick taking games are one of the most common types of card games, and classics like Hearts and Spades are good examples. It is a game where players all have a hand of cards, and game-play revolves around a series of “tricks”, in which each trick involves everyone playing one card from their hand, with the trick typically going to the person who played the highest card. If you have never played a trick-taking game before, I suggest you start with Knock Out Whist, which was listed in the previous category, and is an excellent and fun way to get introduced to this style of game. 500 (4 players) – The national card game of Australia. A skilful trick-taking game where players bid for the number of tricks they think their partnership can win. The winning bidder is allowed to exchange several cards, and select the trump. There is much to love: the trick-taking; the bidding and selecting trump; the exchanging with the kitty to manipulate your hand; the playing in partnerships. A variant for three players also exists. Bezique (2 players) – A classic trick-taker for two players that originated in France, was very popular in the early 20th century, and has some similarities to the two player version of the American game Pinochle. Bridge (4 players) – The ultimate classic among trick-taking card games. It is played in partnerships, and gives much room for much skilful play. Contract Bridge is often played in organized club settings, and the bidding and game-play has an extensive series of conventions that can take some time to learn in order to play well. Briscola (2-6 players) – An Italian trick-taking game that is quite easy to learn and play especially as a two player game. Using just 40 cards, the aim is play tricks from your hand of three in order to win point scoring cards. Apparently this is especially good with the five player Briscola Chiamata variant. Euchre (4 players) – Extremely popular as a social game in parts of Canada and the USA, Euchre can especially be fun when played in a casual tournament setting. Just 25 cards are used, with the Jacks being powerful “bowers”. One partnership is trying to win the most tricks from a five card hand, with trump determined by a turned up card. Ecarte (2 players) is an excellent trick-taking game that is very similar to Euchre, but better suited for a two player game. German Whist (2 players) – An excellent Whist style game for two players. Each player has a hand of 13 cards, and the first phase involves each person playing a card in order to compete for the face up card from the top of the stock (the very first card shown is the trump suit); the winner gets that card, the loser gets the next face-down card. When the stock is gone, you play out your remaining 13 cards, and the player winning the most tricks is the winner. Hearts (3-7 players) – One of the all time classic trick-taking games, where the aim is to avoid taking tricks with Hearts, since these are minus points, while the Queen of Spades is a whopping 13 minus points. There is no trump suit. Jass (2-4 players) – The national Swiss game, playable with two players or in partnerships. This is part of the Jass family which originated in the Netherlands. The wider family includes Belote(French), Klabberjass/Clob (German), and Klaverjassen (Dutch). The Swiss Jass is somewhat similar to Bezique and Pinochle. Le Truc (2 players) – This out-of-the-ordinary betting/bluffing/trick-taking game is a 19th century French game using a 32 card deck, and was especially popularized after inclusion in Sid Sackson’s Gamut of Games. A brilliant bluffing game where you use a hand of three cards to play only three tricks, but can increase the value of a hand throughout the game, to bluff and cause your opponent to fold. Be aware of some rule variations. Both the French Le Truc and the Spanish Truc (which has 2 player partnerships) are derived from the older English game Put (2 players), which is a simpler two player bluffing game that I can also recommend. Ninety-Nine (3 players) – This original game by David Parlett is regarded as one of the very best trick-taking games for exactly 3 players. Only 36 cards are used, and from a hand of 12 players lay aside three cards that represent the number of their bid, and play out the remaining 9 cards in tricks, trying to win exactly the number of tricks corresponding to their bid. Oh Hell (3-7 players) – This goes under many names, including Up and Down the River, Bust, and some less savoury titles that are variations on Oh ***. A great trick taking game where you bid how many tricks you can win, while the hand size increases or decreases each round. The game enables considerable skill, because even with bad cards you score if you bid correctly. Numerous scoring variants exist, one being published commercially under the name Wizard. Pinochle (4 players) – A popular and classic American trick-taking game for partnerships that uses an 80 card deck. Gameplay starts with an auction in which players bid how many points their team will win, with highest bidder picking trump. Each player gets a hand of 20 cards, and individual cards are worth points, as well as combinations of cards in hand (melds). A two-player variant of Pinochle using a single-deck also exists. Piquet (2 players) – This classic game has a very long history going back several centuries. It is demanding since it has some old-fashioned complications, but is still popular, and regarded as one of the all-time best and most skilful card games for just two players. Pitch (4 players) – Derived from the old English game All Fours, this game has especially been popular in parts of the USA, and there are many variations. Typically played in partnerships, it begins with a bidding round after players each are dealt six cards, and bid for many of the following four items they think they will have at the end of a hand: High trump, trick with low trump, trick with Jack of trumps, and highest total point value. Rook (4 players) – Rook is a terrific partnership trick taking game with bidding that was even published commercially under that name with a special deck. The aim is to win tricks with point cards (e.g. the Rook=Joker card is worth 20 points), rather than the maximum number of tricks. The highest bidder has choice of trump, and can exchange with the “nest/kitty” in order to improve their hand. Several good variations exist, and in parts of Canada one of them is played under the name 200 (in French: Deux Cents). Schnapsen (2 players) – Popular in many parts of Europe, Schnapsen is the national card game of Austria, and is a classic trick-taking card game for two players with a long history, and allows for genuinely skilful and clever play. Played with a small deck, one of its peculiarities is how points are scored for “marriages” (King-Queen couples). For a comprehensive look at the difference between the closely related Sixty Six, and common Schnapsen rule variations, see here and here. Skat (3 players) – This classic trick-taking game is the national card game of Germany. It features complex scoring and bidding, but is one of the best card games for three players. A similar game with simpler bidding and scoring rules is Schafkopf, which was been Americanized and popularized by immigrants to the USA as Sheepshead. Also related is the demanding Doppelkopf (i.e. Double Sheepshead). Spades (4 players) – One of the better trick taking games for partnerships, and another classic after being invented and popularized in the USA in the 1930s. Spades are always the trumps, and players bid how many tricks they think they will win in advance. Although the bidding and scoring is not the easiest if you are new to trick-taking games, it is a game that allows for more skill than casual games like euchre. Whist (4 players) – A simple but classic trick-taking card game from which many others are derived. Played in partnerships, there is no trump, and teams try to win the most tricks as they play out a full hand of 13 cards. Good variations include titles elsewhere on this list, like German Whist (2 players) and Knock Out Whist (3-7 players).

Non Trick-Taking Games

Trick taking games are arguably one of the most popular and common types of card games, which is why they were listed as a separate category. But there are certainly a large number of other fantastic card games as well. Most of the games listed in the “Social and Family Games” category were also non tricking-taking games, but the games listed below tend to be a little more thoughtful and involved. Big Two (4 players) – Best with four players (although variants for 2-3 players exist), this along with President (which appears earlier on this list) represents one of the more accessible and well-known climbing games. With the climbing genre, the idea is to be the first player to get rid of all your cards, playing cards individually or in special combinations. For a slightly easier climbing game than Big Two, consider Tien Len, which is the national card game of Vietnam. One of the most popular climbing games of all times is Tichu, which was published commercially with a special deck. Canasta (4 players) – A game that became extremely popular in the 1950s, Canasta uses two standard decks, and is best in two-player partnerships. It is a rummy style of game in which the aim is to make melds of seven cards of the same value, and “go out” by playing your entire hand. There are also several variants, such as the popular Hand and Foot. Cassino (2-4 players) – This classic card game is a “fishing” game that has some parallels to the simpler Scopa (see earlier on this list), and the Anglo-American version is especially popular. Players capture face-up cards in a common pool by playing matching cards from their hand, either individually or a number of cards that adds to a total equalling the card played from hand. Unlike Scopa, players have more options, and can also build cards together for later, which adds a more tactical element. Cribbage (2 players) – A classic card name based on card combinations worth points, with the aim of being first to 121 points, scored by pegging on a board. Players each get a hand of six cards, and must set aside two to a “crib” which will later score for one of the two players. Cards are played in turns, adding their values together until you reach or near 31, and then this is repeated. Players score for combinations like cards that add to 15, pairs/triples, or runs, and also score for their hand at the end. Despite the casual feel, there is considerable skill, and experienced players will consistently outperform novices. Requires decision making for selecting cards for the crib, and which order to play the cards in hand. Even children will enjoy finding the point scoring combinations, while the imbalance/asymmetry of each game turn makes it especially interesting. Eleusis (4-8 players) – A modern card game simulating scientific research, as players (“scientists”) conduct experiments to determine the rule governing play. Players try to get rid of cards by discarding them, but the “rule” that allows legal play is invented by the dealer and is unknown to the players, and they must try to figure out the rule by deducing it from legal plays. Gin Rummy (2 players) – Derived from Rummy (see earlier on this list), Gin Rummy is a “knocking game” that differs from Rummy in that melds are kept in hand until the end of a deal. It is an excellent and time-tested two player game. Nertz (2-6 players) – Also known as “Racing Demon” or “Pounce”, Nertz is a competitive multi-player solitaire that is played in real time. The aim is to be the first to get rid of cards from your Nertz piles by building upwards on common foundations. It is basically the same game as the commercially available Ligretto/Dutch Blitz, but played with a standard deck. Poker (2-10 players) – This is considered the ultimate bluffing game, and No Limit Texas Hold ‘Em has been popularized with the help of television and local tournaments. Players “bet” chips on whether or not they have the best five card poker hand. Many say it is only fun when played for money, suggesting that the thrill is in the gambling rather than the game-play. Even if you do not play for money, you do have to approach the game semi-seriously for it to be fun, otherwise it is too easy for someone to play foolishly and hand another player the game. A must for those who enjoy bluffing. Spite & Malice (2-5 players) – Also known as “Cat & Mouse”, this is a competitive patience/solitaire game for two or more players that uses two decks, and is better known to most people under its commercially produced variation, Skip-Bo. Unlike Speed and Nertz, it is not played simultaneously in real time, because players take turns, but the overall concept is somewhat similar. Zetema (2 players) – This is an obscure Victorian card game that revived in popularity as a result of Sid Sackson’s A Gamut of Games. David Parlett recommends it as an out-of-the-ordinary card game that is “long and savory”. It is played with a 65-card deck (52 cards plus an additional two through Ace in one suit), and each player’s objective is to reach a certain number of points scored by discarding assemblies, completing tricks, setting up marriages, or revealing flushes and sequences. Also playable with four or six players in partnerships.

Recommendations

So where should you start? Hopefully some of the descriptions I have provided will intrigue you enough to give a particular game a shot, or look into it further. But often games will depend on who you are playing with, the number of players you have, and the kind of game you are looking for. So to help you branch out beyond the repertoire that you might already be familiar with, here are some recommendations for games that I especially suggest for different situations. Are you looking for… – a game for just two players? GOPS and Scopa are two simpler games that are quite rewarding. If you want a trick-taking game for just two, then Briscola and German Whist are both straight forward and good choices, while Le Truc is fantastic for those who like bluffing, and Schnapsen is worth the effort to learn if you enjoy skilful play. Cribbage and Gin Rummy are two non trick-taking classics that are every bit as good today as they have always been. – a game for four-players in partnerships? There are several good trick-taking games to choose from in this category, and while the ever-popular Bridge is good, the learning curve can be steep. I recommend starting with a simpler game like Euchre or Whist, or else something that involves more skill, like 500Rook, or Spades, which incorporate the fun of bidding and give opportunity for a winning bidder to strengthen their hand. – a trick-taking game for an odd number of players?Ninety-Nine is the best trick-taker that plays with exactly three players. Hearts and Oh Hell can both handle various player counts, and are very good; if you enjoy bidding for how many tricks you think you will win then Oh Hell is an absolute must. – a light social game for a larger group? Try the classic climbing game President, the almost brainless Ranter-Go-Round, or the frenzy of Spoons, all of which are easy to learn and don not require too much brain power. Blitz and Cheat are also good choices for fun social games that can work with more than four players. – a game that is fast-paced? Try the craziness of two player Speed/Spit, or else ramp up the difficulty slightly with the frantic game-play of the popular Nertz, both of which have simultaneous real-time game-play. Egyptian Ratscrew also requires quick reactions and speed. – a game that is unusual and out-of-the-ordinary? Try the logical deduction required by the clever and inventive Eleusis, or the long and savoury gameplay of Zetema. – a game for older children? Most of the games in the “Social and Family Games” category will work, but fun games that I have had good success with in playing with children include CheatFan TanKnock Out Whist (which also serves as a good introduction to trick-taking), PalaceSpeed, and Spoons. If they can handle the scoring system, Scopa is definitely a rewarding game that older children can enjoy. GOPS produces an excellent head-to-head battle-of-wits for just two. – a game for younger children? There’s a number of classic and very simple games not included on this list, such as Beggar My Neighbour (2-3 players), Crazy Eights (2-7 players), Go Fish (2-6 players), Old Maid (2-12 players), Slap Jack (2-8 players), Snap (2-4 players), and War (2 players). Be aware that some games like Beggar My Neighbour and also War involve no decisions and are a matter of pure luck!

Solitaire Games

But what about if you have nobody to play with? The good news is that there is a wide range of excellent solitaire card games, a category sometimes referred to with the catch-all “Patience”. Patience or Solitaire games are especially popular due to the fact that many of them come pre-installed on personal computer operating systems. Some solitaire games come down to pure luck, but there are many excellent ones that require genuine skill, and can be a very rewarding challenge to play. Rules: Fortunately you can learn many solitaire games with the help of free apps, or the many websites that offer these games to play for free. You will find lots of resources online that will teach you rules for different games, and a good place to begin is the Wikipedia page which lists solitaire games. Also check Polymorphic SolitairePretty Good Solitaire, and Solitaire Network, which all have extensive lists of solitaire games, rules for each, and free online play. Recommendations: There are different types of solitaire games, and here are some of the better and more popular ones I can recommend, grouped according to different categories: Adding and pairing types: Golf, Monte Carlo, Pyramid Non-builder types: Clock Patience, Grandfather’s Clock, Accordion Fan types: La Belle Lucie, The Fan, Super Flower Garden, Shamrocks, Bristol Builder types: Baker’s Dozen, Beleaguered Castle, Canfield, Forty Thieves, Freecell, Klondike, Miss Milligan, Russian Solitaire, Scorpion, Spider, Yukon Other types: Aces Up, Calculation Thematic: I also highly recommend Bowling Solitaire by genius game designer Sid Sackson. It is entirely unlike all the other solitaire games mentioned, but is an incredibly thematic and clever game.

Other Ideas

This article should get you well on your way to playing some fun card games. But if you are interested in exploring the world of card games further, there is certainly a lot more you can do. So here are some ideas for further expanding your horizons, learning more about the great card games that are out there, and even options for playing them when you have nobody else around to play with. Get a book: There are some fantastic books with rules to all the classic card games. You will need some way to learn how to play a new game, and resolve those inevitable rules arguments that might arise. Having a reliable book is something you can take with you when you are on the go. Here are two of the best: ● The Penguin Book of Card Games – Also published under the title The Penguin Encyclopedia of Card Games, this book by David Parlett is easily the most comprehensive book in the English language with standard card games. If you are looking to discover new games, or find rules to lots of different games, this is the best book to get. ● Hoyle’s Rules of Games – An authoritative and standard text on classic card games. I personally own the Third Revised edition (Philip D. Morehead), and have used it often, although it is not as exhaustive as David Parlett’s book, so it can happen that the card game of your choice is not included. But the section on card games is very useful, especially the contents pages which categorizes the games by suitability for adults/children and by number of players; plus it has rules to other classic games as well. This book and a deck of playing cards is all you need to take along on a vacation! Check online resources: There are some terrific resources online about traditional card games. Pagat.com is easily the most authoritative and best when it comes to rules, but there are certainly other places that are helpful as well. Suggestions to get you started: ● Pagat.com – John McLeod’s award-winning site is considered to be the most exhaustive website with rules for different card games played with a standard deck. An outstanding and useful resource. ● BicycleCards.com – Bicycle’s official website has their official rules for many different card games. It also has a helpful search function that allows you to find a suitable card game based on the number of players, who is playing, and type of game. ● BoardGameGeek.com – BoardGameGeek.com is the world’s largest community of boardgamers. This page lists a number of games that can be played with a standard deck of playing cards, and gives some other links to their site. Also check their family page for traditional card games for more. ● Poker Suite – Cheapass Games offers a free download of the rules PDF for their Poker Suite, which is a collection of 14 original games that is well worth looking at. Play using an app: If you are not quite sure on the rules of how to play a specific card game mentioned above, there are plenty of apps available that will help you with that. The ideal way to learn a game is to have someone teach you, but an app is a fantastic second best, because it will enforce the rules. Many of them also include tutorials. There are quite a few software programs for card games that are readily available as well – most versions of Windows will come with Hearts and Spades, and some solitaire games too. Here are some good free apps for iOS for some of the games listed above; I’ve personally used, enjoyed, and can recommend all of these: Cribbage Craze (Cribbage) by Tim Eakins, Thirty One Rummy (Blitz) by North Sky Games, Briscola Pro (Briscola) by Appsmob, Scopa Dal Negro (Scopa) by Digitalmoka Sri, Master Schnapsen/66 Lite (Schnapsen) by Psellos, Truco Argentina (Le Truc) by Jaime Garcia Ghirelli. There is also a great free app called Bicycle How To Play by United States Playing Card Company. You cannot play any games with this app, but it comes with rules for many of the most popular card games, so it functions as a digital document you can use on the fly to find the rules you need. Play online: Playing with an app that incorporates multiplayer games is one way to play online, but there are also websites dedicated to this purpose as well. This is not something I have tried much myself, but here are a few that you can start with: cardgames.ioworldofcardgames.comtrickstercards.com, and cardzmania.com. Ask family and friends: Many families have their household favourites. Perhaps some of your friends know some great card games that they would just love to teach you! A night playing card games with family or friends makes for a relaxing social evening, and is a great way to spend time together.
So dust off that custom deck that is looking down at you expectantly from the shelf, invite over some family or friends, and get those playing cards to the table. Enjoy your deck and discover the fun that playing card games has been bringing people around the world for centuries!

Do you ever play card games? Which games do you play most? What do you think of the listed games?

About the writer: EndersGame is a well-known reviewer of board games and playing cards. He loves card games, card magic, and card collecting. You can see a complete list of his playing card reviews here. ● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Games at: ShuffledInk

GREAT QUOTES AND ONE-LINERS ABOUT PLAYING CARDS

GREAT QUOTES AND ONE-LINERS ABOUT PLAYING CARDS
A deck of cards isn’t just a box filled with 52 pieces of cardboard. These playing cards can become your friends in a card game, your accomplices in a magic trick, and your companions in a deck collection. They can even represent something much bigger than the contents of a small box. To some, a deck of cards can represent a prayer book and a Bible. There’s an old story – sometimes circulated by email – where a soldier explains how his playing cards help him talk to God. When hauled before a superior to explain why he uses the devil’s picture book in church, he starts going through his entire well-worn deck, explaining as follows: “Your Honor, to me this deck of cards is my prayer book and Bible. When I look into these cards and see an Ace, it reminds me that there is only one God. When I see the Deuce, it reminds me that the Bible is divided into two parts, the Old and the New Testaments. When I see the Trey, it represents the three persons of the Blessed Trinity – the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost.” He also explains how it represents the 52 weeks of a year, four seasons, and more. You can find many versions of this great story online – read one here. But playing cards can also be a source of wisdom. These 52 paste-boards have inspired witty thinkers, philosophers, and comedians alike, to come up with clever one-liners and sayings about playing cards. The fact that playing cards have served as chosen symbols and metaphors to impart wisdom says something about how popular and influential playing cards have been in our culture. I’ve scoured far and wide, and what you see here represents the best quotes and one-liners about playing cards that I could find. I haven’t been able to verify each and every source, although I’ve done the best I can to attribute these correctly. But in the end, the most important thing is the genius of the quotes themselves. So enjoy these pithy sayings, and put them to work for you!

Life

“Life is like a game of cards. The hand you are dealt is determinism; the way you play it is free will.” – Jawaharlal Nehru “We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the game.” – Randy Pausch “Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes, playing a poor hand well.” – Jack London “Just because Fate doesn’t deal you the right cards, it doesn’t mean you should give up. It just means you have to play the cards you get to their maximum potential.” – Les Brown “Each player must accept the cards life deals him or her; but once they are in hand, he or she alone must decide how to play the cards in order to win the game.” – Voltaire “Destiny plays its cards in a way that no one can comprehend.” – Anurag Shourie “Just when you think you’re playing your cards right, God shuffles the deck.” – Mark Sheppard

Choices

“One should always play fairly when one has the winning cards.” – Oscar Wilde “In order to win you must be prepared to lose sometime. And leave one or two cards showing.” – Van Morrison “A good lawyer, just like a good poker player, must always keep his cards close to his chest.” – Mallika Nawal “The cards always look different when it’s your turn to play them; loaded with subtly different possibilities.” – Alastair Reynolds

Wisdom

“If you are going to build something in the air it is always better to build castles than houses of cards.” – Georg C. Lichtenberg “No one knows what is on the other side of a playing card.” – Jose Hernandez “Everyone should be able to do one card trick, tell two jokes, and recite three poems, in case they are ever trapped in an elevator.” – Daniel Handler

Potential

“A pack of cards is a pile of 52 pieces of cardboard that can be bent, stacked, and stuck together in a seemingly endless array of variations.” – Jay Sankey “When I look at playing cards, I see limitless potential. When these simple symbols are shuffled, fortunes are won, the future is foretold, or magic is unleashed.” – Joshua Jay “Playing cards have the ability to cloud men’s minds, or to dominate them.” – Ricky Jay “Cards are power; learn to harness that power, and you will be forever rewarded.” – James Swain “Cards are like living, breathing beings and should be treated as such.” – Dai Vernon

Games

“Cards are one means of bridging differences in age and habits, drawing children and parents, old and new friends together in fair and friendly competition.” – Florence Osborn “Rummy is deservedly popular because it is easy to learn, fast to play, suitable for all ages, playable by any number, and as suitable for gamblers as for missionaries – though perhaps not both at once.” – David Parlett “Cards are war, in disguise of a sport.” – Charles Lamb “There are no friends at cards or world politics.” – Finley Peter Dunne “Trust everybody, but always cut the cards.” – Finley Peter Dunne “Playing cards is addictive. So are the playing cards themselves. My habit has me up to two packs a day.” – Joshua Jay

Magic

“For a professional magician, a stack of playing cards is as good as a stack of money.” – Amit Kalantri “A magician may step out without a purse, but he should never step out without a pack of playing cards.” – Amit Kalantri “All the magicians have 52 mutual friends.” – Amit Kalantri

Humor

“I stayed up one night playing poker with tarot cards. I got a full house and four people died.” – Steven Wright “Those bellhops in Miami are tip-happy. I ordered a deck of playing cards and the bellboy made fifty-two trips to my room.” – Henny Youngman “Men are like a deck of cards. You’ll find the occasional king, but most are jacks.” – Laura Swenson “Love is like a card trick. After you know how it works, it’s no fun any more.” – Fanny Brice “Marriage is a lot like playing cards. In the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond. By the end, you’ll wish you had a club and a spade.” – Unknown
So next time someone challenges you that playing cards are just for kids, speaks condescendingly about your deck collection, or frowns at your love for playing card games or performing card magic, whip out some of these verbal gems, and silence their criticism with some philosophy, wit, or humor!

Did we miss your favorite playing card expression?  Comment below.

About the writer: EndersGame is a well-known reviewer of board games and playing cards. He loves card games, card magic, and card collecting. You can see a complete list of his playing card reviews here. ● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Games at: ShuffledInk

COMMONLY PLAYED FAMILY CARD GAMES

COMMONLY PLAYED FAMILY CARD GAMES
Playing cards originated during the 10th century in China. Back then, the card’s design carried a considerably different look and shape than what we know today. Instead of suits and faces, citizens would draw domino dots on slips of paper. Once playing cards reached Europe during the 14th century, its appearance transformed to hand-painted drawings. But while the artwork evolved as time progressed, one steady tradition was always present: playing card games. Flash forward to the 21st century, where many card games with varying designs and purposes are created and played daily. Generally, families have at least one playing card game in their home. According to The Board Game Family, 96 percent of families who play these games feel closer to one another. Family gatherings often involve playing both classic and new games that every family member can take part in and enjoy. This is why card game family traditions will never go out of style. So, shuffle the playing field during your next family event with a classic or new game of your choice. Here’s our list of commonly played family card games that you can try!

Popular Family Card Games

1. SPOONS

This family card game is played with a traditional 52-card deck and basic household silverware: spoons. To play an efficient game of Spoons, you must shuffle the playing cards before dealing to ensure an even playing field. This is a quick-paced game with a fair amount of bluffing for all players involved. Now, this is not a relaxed game in the slightest; your attention and focus will be torn in many directions. Your goal is to obtain four of a kind, meaning the faces must be the same but the suit doesn’t matter. In addition, you should also be looking out for missing spoons. If there’s a missing spoon, this means someone has already secured four of a kind. Now, here’s the fun, competitive part. If you do notice a missing spoon, then any of the remaining spoons are up for grabs even if you do not have four of a kind. Unfortunately, in every game, there has to be a loser. So, the player who does not pick up a spoon in time loses.
Since Spoons is played with a traditional deck of playing cards, try your hand at designing your own custom card back. At Shuffled Ink’s Design Shop, everything revolves around your unique style. You decide the template, image, colors, font, and more! The possibilities are endless, and the Design Shop will help bring your vision to life.

2. WAR

The card game War is played with a standard 52-card deck and requires two players. But don’t worry, War can still be played during your family game night. Rather than each round played by all family members, War can be played in a tournament-style fashion, where the winner of each round plays whoever is up next until someone finally wins. Now, how do you play? It’s important to thoroughly shuffle the deck in a way that will randomize the playing cards. Cut the deck in half, and deal each player 26 cards, one at a time, face down. Then, once all cards are dealt, both players reveal one of their cards. Whichever player has the highest card of the two will win that hand and collect both cards. Once there are no more cards to reveal, each player will count how many cards they have, and whoever has the most is the winner.

What does it mean to have ‘War’?

  • If both players reveal two cards of the same rank, then you have WAR.
  • When this happens, each player will put one card face down and one card face up.
  • Once revealed, the player who has the highest card takes both piles. If the cards happen to be the same rank again, then each player places one of their cards face down and flips one card face up.
  • And, naturally, the player who has the highest card will collect all of the playing cards that were dealt during that round of War.

3. UNO

This shedding-type card game is one of the most well-known and commonly played games. Playing UNO reminds me of summer vacations spent with my grandma, where it became a family tradition to play the card game every night after dinner. There’s something truly special about a card game that can successfully entertain people of all ages, connecting both an 80-year-old and a 7-year-old (in my case). Invented in 1971, the first people to play Merle Robbins’ newfound game was his family.   And with their stamp of approval, it soon turned into the classic family-friendly game we all know and love. But the game’s success and efficiency require proper dealing and shuffling in order to keep each game fresh and competitive. The shuffling procedure provides each player with an equal element of chance, creating a fun game that packs together the holy trinity: luck, surprise and betrayal.
UNO: Common Family Card Game

4. HEDBANZ

Hedbanz is the perfect card game to include during your next family game night. This is a guessing game, where each player has a card on their forehead with a cartooned image of an animal, object or food. The goal is to guess “What Am I?”. A big rule is to only ask ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions during your timed guessing turn. This kid-friendly card game can easily become your newfound family tradition.

A Pack of Possibilities at Hand

 
Customized Card Game – Prudential Game of Odds Just like UNO, every single card game began as a customized project idea. When thinking about the most popular card games played today, such as Apples to Apples, Codenames, etc., your ideas can just as easily become the next big card game; the next family tradition. Unlock all of your creative ideas. Explore our options to produce your next project and request a quote today! ● Official Shuffled Ink website: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Playing Cards at: ShuffledInk ● Make Your Own Custom Card Games at: ShuffledInk

MASTER POKER CHEAT SHEET & TEXAS HOLD’EM FOR BEGINNERS

MASTER POKER CHEAT SHEET & TEXAS HOLD'EM FOR BEGINNERS

Whether you’re using casino chips or crunchy, edible ones, you need to “walk the walk” and “talk the talk” during poker night.  Seems simple, right?  Just show up on your A game and you’re good to go. But wait…there’s one issue. Having watched too many quick-paced tutorials and downloaded countless poker game apps, you’re starting to wonder if understanding poker is even in the cards for you.

You’re in luck! Here’s our master poker cheat sheet and guide to Texas Hold’em for beginners.  It’s all you need to join the game!

Basic Poker Lingo

Get out your flash cards because it’s definition time!

  • Texas Hold’em: A common variation of poker, played with a standard deck of 52 playing cards (no Jokers).
  • The Pot: Sum of money waged by all the types of card players throughout the game.  Whichever player has the best 5-card combination wins the pot.
  • Act: A player decides what to do with their hand when it’s their turn to play.
  • Bet: How much money you want to wage/contribute in(to) the pot.
  • Check: Knock on the table or say “check” if you decide to not act in a specific round.
  • Community cards: Five cards dealt face up in the center of the board. These cards are available for all players to complete their five-card hands. Players mentally configure their 5-card hand as each community card is dealt.
  • Fold: If you don’t have a strong hand, or you think someone else’s is stronger, forfeit your hand and all the chips you’ve put into the pot.  This means you are not allowed to act during the rest of the hand.
  • Call: When you match the amount bet by the player who acted before you.
  • Raise: When you increase the betting stakes for the participating poker players (only if your bet, or someone else’s, was previously matched). The original bettor will have the option to match your raise if he/she wants to continue participating in the hand.
  • No-Limit Poker: No limit is placed on how much you can bet.
  • Limit Poker: A limit is placed on how much you can bet.

Poker Basic Positions

Players rotate clockwise and will represent each of these positions over the course of the game.

  • Button/Dealer: Player who is dealing the cards and chips. If you’re playing at a casino, he/she does not play during the game.  If you’re playing at home, the dealer usually plays and is the last person to place their bet.
  • Small Blind (SB): Player who goes first in every round and is seated directly to the left of the dealer.
  • Big Blind (BB): Player seated directly to the left of the SB.  He/she goes second after the flop (flop, step 4)
  • The SB and BB are required to contribute a certain amount depending on the type of game being played.
  • If you are playing a 2-5 no-limit poker game, then the SB wages $2 and the BB wages $5 before any action commences (during the pre-flop, step 4)
  • The Cut Off (CO): The position just before the button.  If the button is not playing, then this player is the last person to bet.  If the button is playing, then this player is the second to last to act.  Whoever is the last player to act has the best betting advantage because he/she gets to see everyone else’s actions.

What is a Strong Hand in Poker?

(P.S. there are 5 cards in a hand)

The 5-card combination hand rankings from highest to lowest value:

  • Suit: ♣️Clubs, Diamonds, Hearts, ♠️ Spades
  • Rank: Card value.  For example, a King has more value than a Queen.

1. Royal Flush: An unbeatable hand, consisting of these cards in identical suits.

2. Straight Flush: Five cards in numerical order with all identical suits. The highest possible flush is a Royal Flush.  (See image above)

3. Four of a Kind: Four cards of the same rank and one kicker card, which is used to break ties if your opponent has the same hand.  Whichever kicker card is higher, wins the hand. In this case, Jack is the kicker card.

  • Another player cannot have Four of a Kind unless all four cards being used come from the community cards.

4. Full House: Three cards match in rank, with two additional cards matching in another rank.  To create the strongest Full House hand, the three matched cards should be higher in rank than the other two matched cards (suit doesn’t matter).

5. Flush: These five cards must all belong to the same suit.  If there’s a tiebreaker, the player with the highest card will determine the winner.

  • The highest possible Flush hand is an Ace.

6. Straight: Five consecutive cards of different suits.  For this hand, Aces can act simultaneously as the highest and lowest card.

7. Three of a Kind: Three cards of the same rank and two kicker cards.

8. Two Pair: Two pairs of the same rank. The higher the pairs are ranked, the better chance you’ll have to win.

9. One Pair: One pair of the same rank.  The best possible scenario would be a pair of Aces, as shown below.

10. High Card: While this is the lowest-ranked hand, it is not completely useless to play.  The five cards are not consecutive and do not belong to the same suit or rank.  If your opponent has a High Card, too, and your highest card beats their highest card, then you win the hand.

A Guide on How to Play Texas Hold’em (For Beginners)

Five community cards are dealt during the four rounds of play, and bets are waged.

Round 1

Pre-Flop: Two hole cards are dealt to each player face down, sculpting your 5-card hand foundation.  These two cards should be viewed privately before the betting begins.

Pre-Flop Betting: The BB and SB place their bets. The amount bet depends on the type of game played (2-4 no limit, 2-5 no limit, etc.). The action starts with the player seated to the left of the BB.

Round 2

One card is burned, or discarded, before the playable community cards are dealt.

Flop: The dealer places three cards face up for all players to use in their hand.  The rotation from player to player moves clockwise from the dealer position.

Flop Betting/Checking: Unlike Round 1, the SB acts first and has the option to either bet or check; both cannot be done at once.  If the SB decides to bet, then all other players are not allowed to check.  These other players must either call the bet, raise or fold. If the SB decides to check, then the option to bet or check falls in the hands of the next player.

Round 3

Turn: The dealer burns another card and then places a fourth card face up (next to the three community cards already on the board) for any player to use.

Turn Betting/Checking: This is the same as betting on the flop. The SB will decide whether to bet or check.  When all bets are equalized through calling, then the round ends. The player who initiated the last bet or raise wins the pot if all remaining players decide to fold.

Round 4

River: The dealer burns another card and then places the fifth (and final) card face up for anyone to use.

River Betting/Checking/Winning: This is the same as betting on the flop and turn. The difference is when the round ends, either with everyone checking or all players having bet or raised, the remaining players must reveal their two hole cards and the pot is awarded to the player with the highest possible 5-card hand.  If one player makes a bet or a raise that is not called by anyone else and all other players fold, the pot is awarded to the last remaining player in the hand.

Showdown

If there are at least two players who have not folded after the River, then those players must reveal their cards to determine who has the best hand. This player will ultimately win the pot.

Strategies

Win the Pot.

If you have the best 5-card combination hand after all community cards are dealt, then you win the entire pot.  If you and another player have the exact same hand, then you traditionally split the pot.

Deceit/Bluffing.

Poker is a mind game, and your deceptive persona can be used to convince your opponents to abandon their hand (even if theirs is stronger).  Remember, if you overuse the bluffing technique it may hurt your game more than it helps.  Strategizing when and how often you should use this game of trickery depends on who you’re playing with, your level of skilled deceitfulness and your hand.

Risk.

Playing each hand is not advised.  It’s important to know when to check and fold if you’re not confident in your hand.  For players who constantly itch for action and continue waging regardless of their hand, remember the money you already have is just as valuable as the money you can possibly earn.

Have fun.

Yes, this may sound cliché, but what’s the point if you’re not having fun during a game? Poker can be extremely competitive, so it’s important to kindly accept the outcome, win or lose.

Make it Personal

Consider customizing your own 54-card poker-sized deck in Shuffled Ink’s Design Shop, where you’re able to personalize your signature custom poker set.  Use your go-to deck in a game setting with friends or while practicing after hours.

Even if you’re not the best player at the table, at least now you have a better understanding on how to “walk the walk” and “talk the talk” poker style, and you’ll have a one-of-a-kind playing card deck, too.